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Old June 8, 2006, 05:40 PM   #1
JillChang
 
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[2006] Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

I was sitting at a new Brazilian BBQ that just opened up in Alladin's shopping mall across from Polo Towers, I was there early (7pm) and the section of the restaurant I was in was empty except for us and two other tables, so I can pretty much hear everything.

It turns out that the other two tables are both timeshare salesperson. A man selling Westgate, and a woman selling Fairfield. The two tables strike up a conversation, with me listening on the side

The man apparently produces a Rock n' Roll show in Las Vegas, but told the woman that he decided to give timeshare sale a try and is doing well. He said he only does one tour a day and is doing so well that he is not giving it up while he continue to produce his show in Las Vegas. They told each other what their timeshares sell for and their average sales. The man apparently makes either at least 5k a week or 5k per sale (I think it is 5k a week), his average sales is 19k. I didn't hear how much the woman makes, but she sells timeshare up to 100k, and said she does a lot of conversions. They talked about qualifying for "national", which I assume is a qualification they need to sell timeshares across state lines. They both talked about how well timeshare is selling in Las Vegas and that the next hot spot is Southern California where they plan to be.

Now imagine only working 2 hours a day and makes 5k a week (because the man said all he has to do is one tour a day), that's how much fat there is in selling new timeshares! They are both saying how much they enjoy selling timeshare and said they will never give it up!

I just sat there listening, all the time thinking thank god I found TUG first, and feeling sorry for all those people they ripped off!.
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Old June 8, 2006, 06:02 PM   #2
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

I have made a lot of friends who are timeshare salesmen and women. Top timeshare salespeople are the best at sales in the world. Think about it. Getting people who come in proactively not wanting to buy a product and then getting them to buy the 2nd or 3rd most expensive product they will buy in their life in a couple hours. That is the World Series of sales.

There are 3 primary types of sales. Front line, Inhouse and Exit. Front line are the people who take the random tours coming in the door. In house are those who provide owner updates to current owners. Exit sales are those people after all is said and done offers a survey and tries to sell a one-time vacation.

More than 75% of all timeshare sales people fail. They just can't get the formula right. The top 5% make all the money. Timeshare sales people work on 100% commission with heavy accelerators. The start at around 5-6% of sales that make it past the recission period and the accelerators kick in at various sales levels. The kickers go all the way up to around 16% or more and that is applied to every deal done that month. The top sales guys make in excess of $300,000 per year. The average is more like $50k.

The key metric for a timeshare sales guy is their APG or average per guest which is their sales efficiency. That means that every tour that gets in front of them generates that amount of revenue for the company. I know one person with an APG of $5000. That nets him about $300k per year. The average sales guy has an APG of about $1500. If you're average, you close 1 in 10 deals. You are good if you close 2 in 10 and you are a superstar if you close 3 in 10.

Timeshare sales is a head game. You can get an an unbelievable win streak and sell everyone in front of you. Then, you can go cold and sell nothing for weeks. It's a fascinating profession. I think you either have it or you don't. If you have it, you work 20 hours per week and make over $200k. If you don't, you are working nights as a waiter or waitress so that you can pay your rent.
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Old June 8, 2006, 07:02 PM   #3
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Lightbulb Great sport

I agree with BB that timeshare salesreps can make the kind of money that a physician makes $300,000 and above per year with little or no education. I can easily spot the “hot shots”, the guys (includes gals too) with special plaques on their wall about the “President’s Club” and other awards they have won. They have special business cards and aren’t afraid to hand them out to you.

I’ve found that these guys don’t need to lie or snooker you they have the skills to sell ice cubes to Eskimos and find that selling timeshares is so easy that they work the hardest in the place to set all kinds of sales records wherever they go.

Marriott has gypsy salesreps who make $300k each year and only sell the Platinum Plus holiday weeks and once those are sold out move to another new Marriott to do the same.

This only accounts for probably 15% of the sales force with the Bell-Curve dictating that their counterpart of dolts who are lucky to get to work in the morning account for another 15%. The rest are average and probably make a descent moderate living and don’t try that hard and check the clock to make sure it’s not after 5 PM.

When we are matched with a super salesrep it’s a pleasure – he already knows seconds after the hand shakes that it’s a lost cause and hurries us to gifting so he can grab another tour that day. They try for at least 3 tours a day.

It’s the middle group of 70% of the salesreps that lies, fibs, tells white lies, snookers, diverts, and deceives us and turns from a pleasant sort of fellow to a scoundrel when they learn that their tricks didn’t fool us – and are they ticked off. These are the clowns who snort and slam down books and kick us out of the office towards gifting.

These are the guys who call in the second wave of salesreps to take over their disaster and are fearful of being fired since they couldn’t sell water to a thirsty man in the desert. These folks are desperate and will do literally anything to make a sale – anything.

This group is also the most fun to have fun with – they know next to nothing about exchanges or how ownership works – these guys don’t own a timeshare (90% of timeshare salesreps don’t own a timeshare – my statistic) and work on rumors of what other owners may have done. It’s fun to plant false rumors and watch them get all excited about doing something that just can’t be done – I’m sure that rumor will be used in the next tour.

This is great sport.
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Old June 8, 2006, 09:25 PM   #4
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

They have to be good salesmen to convince people without telling the whole truth. They put the price on the table and then divide that price by twenty years and hope that you are stupid enough not to add in the maintenance fees times 20 years. They need to sell you before you start looking closely at their dishonest numbers.

They are doubletalkers, purposely keeping you from looking at the numbers. It worked on us twice.
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Old June 9, 2006, 08:23 AM   #5
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

JillChang,

You have to remember that TS salespeople are often know for how well they can exagerate the numbers. BoccaBums sales figures (1 in 10, 2 in 10 and 3 in 10) are in line with what I've learned in talking with other TS salespeople we've become friends with. It stunned me in some ways because, at one time, I was in sales and the numbers were 3 in 10 for "qualified" leads. However, with TS most of those presentations aren't to "qualified" leads. They're simply unsuspecting individuals grabbed off the street with an offer of free tickets, free spending money, cold hard cash, show tickets or any combination of other offeres. Those are the type of cold leads that led to numbers of 1-10 just to get an interview with. (100 people spoken to every day led to 10 leads led to 3 qualified leads led to 1 sale per day).
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Old June 9, 2006, 08:44 AM   #6
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

Quote:
Originally Posted by rickandcindy23
They have to be good salesmen to convince people without telling the whole truth. They put the price on the table and then divide that price by twenty years and hope that you are stupid enough not to add in the maintenance fees times 20 years. They need to sell you before you start looking closely at their dishonest numbers.

They are doubletalkers, purposely keeping you from looking at the numbers. It worked on us twice.
Cindy,

I actually think that many timeshare sales people do not know they are lying. The sales training focuses on selling emotion, not fact. They always need to provide a minimum amount of logic to justify the emotional sale. That's why they even do any math at all, even though it is bogus math.

The best sales guys want to focus on how much you love your children and grandchildren and how purchasing a timeshare will give you a lifetime of memories with them. They focus on selling a fear. Fear of loss of love, loss of life or loss of a deal. Fear of loss is far more powerful than expectation of pleasure.

The most important sales technique is not the lie. It is the "take away." Get your tour guest to focus on dream vacations with their grandchildren getting them to admit the guilt they feel for not treating their children as well as they'd like to have. Start crossing their dreams out every time they say they can't afford it or it is the wrong time. Break down the purchase to $20-30/week and asking them, "so are you meaning to tell me that your grandchildren aren't worth more than 2 trips per week to McDonald's?" If you got to spend just one more vacation with your father before he died, wouldn't those memories be worth every penny you put into this timeshare? What are you waiting for?

Less product details and financial details means more sales volume. The kiss of death to a timeshare salesman is the "I need to think about it" close. They want you to focus on your loved ones because you don't need to think about whether or not you love them. You just do.

I do believe that what the timeshare sales guy is selling is indeed real. That's why it works. It's just that if consumers were a bit wiser, they can get a much better deal.
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Old June 9, 2006, 09:12 AM   #7
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Lightbulb My Stats

I’ve said it many times “The ONLY reason the timeshare industry flourishes is due to ignorant consumers making poor decisions.”

Here are statistics that I’ve gleamed from 25+ sales presentations:

• 90% of all timeshare salesreps don’t own a timeshare – and for good reason

• 80% of developer sales are financed at loan-shark rates of 14.99% and above

• 1 in 7 sales presentations (Tours) winds up with a sale

• $400 is the cost to the developer for each tour

• The odds favor the salesrep spewing false and misleading information than correct information

• Selling timeshares is an ambush type of impulse sale

• Renting the same exact timeshare is about equal, in cost, to buying from the developer and financing that timeshare makes renting half the cost of buying

• The topic of resales will never be brought up so how to sell your timeshare, down the road, will never be discussed.

If someone wants to dispute the above with links to hard data, I’m glad to modify my findings. Until then these are “Perry’s Timeshare Statistics” which I’ve brandished around for quite a while with no hard data to refute them. These statistics were discovered by asking the same type of questions 25+ times at the tours without the salesrep or sales manager proving me wrong.

Consider for a moment that for each sale, 7 Ma’s and Pa’s must endure the 90 minute sales pitch. They get a gift but there is also expenses involved with the tour – like the display unit is not sold nor rented for income. 7 * $400 = $2,800 is spent for each sale.

If we guess that the average timeshare sold is $25,000 that’s about the same as a Camry. Imagine the car dealer handing out gifts totaling $2,800 and related expenses in order to beat a sale out of Ma and Pa #7.

Selling timeshare is very tough and if the new buyer simply types in “Timeshares” into Google he will see TUG #3 on the list and I’ll bet we could easily talk 90% of the new buyers out of buying from the developer and take their time to determine if they need a timeshare at all. "Due diligence" are words the salesrep doesn't want to hear.

You can see why the developer can’t reference the Internet in any way – ignorance and poor choices are their allies.

So the next time you take a tour ask this simple question:

So, how many timeshares do you own?” Our rep will be stunned and if that doesn’t convince him to send you packing to gifting ask him:

“I see 15 of your timeshares up for sale on the resale market for 1/2 the price – why should I buy from you?” that should end the tour early and you might have time to squeeze in another tour that day.

Last edited by PerryM; June 9, 2006 at 01:14 PM.
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Old June 9, 2006, 10:08 AM   #8
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

Sometimes I have the misfortune of getting stuck in a golf foursome with a timeshare salesman.

The more interesting ones I've gotten stuck with have been the former salesmen, the ones who could not stomach the scams. They love to talk about how bad it is.

I called on two ads this Spring. I feel there are things I could do to help, like, for instance, developing resale program for resorts that don't have them, incorporating owned weeks into the developer mix, and helping owners get more when they are ready to sell.

The first manager I talked to, a lady, I could tell I would not last a day with.

The second one, a guy, but a guy that did not really sound like a timeshare sales manager, sounded hopeful. It was for a very nice resort and a very solid resort chain. He said he is open to people from outside the industry, because those who are already in the timeshare sales game come with so much baggage.

I tried to convince myself that I could sell timeshares by telling folks what it has meant to me and my family. I could show them all the pictures of all the great vacations we have had and all the extended family that has gone with us. But, in my mind I would know that we paid $1500, $750, and $300 for our weeks. I would have to tell them that for it to be the full truth.

It was at that point that I decided I did not want to feel that knot in my stomach that I had during my ten years in direct sales. I know that if I went back to work like that, that at some point I would be faced with having to tell a lie to increase my pay check. I don't see any way I could avoid it. If I did not tell those lies, and did not get sales, they would not keep me on.

Money is nice, but not that important to me, for now.
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Old June 9, 2006, 12:28 PM   #9
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

The next time I go on a timeshare presentation, I am going to ask the big question that plagues those who try it:

"Can I exchange my week into a unit in Hawaii or at DVC and rent it out for a profit?"

When the timeshare sleaze says, "Why yes you can," I will ask the manager when he comes in to "close the deal" for proof that I can exchange into something better, then rent it out for big money.

If that lie continues, I will ask them to call RCI or II and allow me to ask that same question of the vacation guide.

That will get me out quickly. Of course, then you have to LIE and say, "I don't know anything about timeshare." Innocent little me could not lie about owning timeshare, partly because I am quite a braggart. I like to tell them (timeshare salespeople) that my two best traders were purchases made from our longtime resort, for $2,500 total, for two consecutive weeks. I always add, "these weeks got me here, didn't they?" Of course there is always that stupid comeback: "You were lucky to get a trade into this resort, you are not likely to be offered this resort again." Oh well, I am not going to sit there and argue with them that I can get into their resort whenever I want (because the 1 in 4 does stop me for a while).

Boca-The perfect way to introduce yourself at a timeshare presentation is "lucky and grateful to be empty nesters, glad to vacation now without the whining and extra baggage of kids. This time is now for us." Then they cannot do the guilt thing on us. I have never used that one, but it would work for us.
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Old June 9, 2006, 12:57 PM   #10
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

I was stunned last year when I went to a sales presentation last year at the Marriott Grande Vista and the person who claimed to be number 1 in all of Marriott told me one of the things that he did.

He said that he owns a few Marriott Grande Vista lock off units. He would split the locks offs and exchange for 2 bedroom units at Cypress Harbour and rent them on eBay for $2000/week.

I asked him if II allowed him to rent the exchanges and he said he could because it was a Marriott internal exchange.

Of course, I also knew that the market rate for a rental at that resort is more in the $1000 range. I didn't let him know that I knew.
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Old June 9, 2006, 01:33 PM   #11
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Wink More exchanging advice for the #1 Marriott salesrep

BB,

You passed up a great opportunity help the #1 salesrep in Marriott – advertise the II exchange on eBay – it brings in much higher rentals. This helpful hint would mean more money in his pocket. Inform him that II exchanges really bring in the big bucks

I would have informed him that Marriott RCI exchanges into the RCI Point system would allow him to buy airline tickets for 50˘ on the dollar. He could do a lock off and add a third bedroom to the RCI Point deposit.

There are lots of helpful hints you could have given our Marriott owner – next time you meet him he might just appreciate the helpful hints. I give these out all the time to our salesrep - they really appreciate them.
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Old June 9, 2006, 01:46 PM   #12
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

Georgio at EVR at Poipu, or whatever it is now called, said he trades his week through RCI for Caribbean weeks and then sells them for $14000!
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Old June 9, 2006, 02:04 PM   #13
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

I must say that I am amazed that anyone would go to a timeshare presentation just to make a point. We know they stretch the truth, we know that a lot of timeshare presenters don't have or are not given all the facts. We know that we'll be told things that just aren't true and could never happen yet some feel the need to waste an hour or two of their time in the vain attempt to "prove" it to one salesman who might not really care. As if all of this effort would make any difference in how timeshares are sold. I would think we all would have better things to do with our time.
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Old June 9, 2006, 03:24 PM   #14
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Lightbulb It's a job

We used to go to the timeshare presentations (Tours) to try to learn something about timeshares – we now just go to make an average $300 (Maui) for 90 minutes work – that comes out to be $200 per hour while on vacation). Now we try to see just how fast we can get out by bringing up things that should have a sharp salesrep waving us goodbye while they grab another tour. Our goal is for 30 minutes which would be $600 per hour – now that’s more like it.

We typically swim and snorkel in the morning, (Maui) do a tour, and shop and dine out at night. Most of our expensive dinners are paid by the developers – thanks. We try to get a free lunch with the tour – sometimes they really put on the feedbag and you get a 4-course lunch. I do wish they would not have donuts but something more healthful for those of us who do quite a few of these. I keep suggesting this but they just don’t seem to listen.

There is an implied contract here – we give them up to 90 minutes of our vacation time and they try to sell us another timeshare. They asked the qualifying questions, which we always surpass and then it’s up to their product and sales skills.

I do try to gather some statistical data for later analysis: 1) does the salesrep own a timeshare? 2) Does the salesrep own a timeshare at the resort they currently sell at 3) Is the salesrep honest? 4) What new sales gimmicks have been added since our last visit 5) What new things are happening at the resort and for the developer 6) What is their level of timeshare knowledge 7) Current sales prices and MFs

I advise probably 50+ folks in a year how to use timeshares and someone’s got to look out for them. Thank goodness the developers pays for all of this.

Last edited by PerryM; June 9, 2006 at 03:27 PM.
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Old June 9, 2006, 06:26 PM   #15
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

I am surprised how many don't own any real estate at all. When I was selling real estate as a traditional broker one of the glass ceilings many salespeople had was not being able to sell above the quality of home they owned...or had lived in while growing up. It was like they just could not believe someone would pay $300K for a house when they have only paid $75. (1980's)
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Old June 9, 2006, 08:31 PM   #16
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

We had such a great timeshare sales woman at HGVC in Waikola last year that it really made me want to sell for them (and live in Hawaii, of course). She was very honest, as was I. When you see some of the people in Hawaii dropping money on every single tourist thing possible in one week, you realize that these people can afford to pay top dollar for the convenience of buying from the developer of a large, well respected company. It was a great presentation and fun.
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Old June 9, 2006, 11:52 PM   #17
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

Quote:
Originally Posted by mdmbdumont
I am surprised how many don't own any real estate at all. When I was selling real estate as a traditional broker one of the glass ceilings many salespeople had was not being able to sell above the quality of home they owned...or had lived in while growing up. It was like they just could not believe someone would pay $300K for a house when they have only paid $75. (1980's)

Some people don't see real estate as important, especially if they work a lot of hours and aren't home to enjoy it (and maintain it). Many well-to-do people rent precisely because they don't want the responsibilities that come with ownership, as well as the liabilities like potential lawsuits.

Their cars might actually be where they spend a lot of time, come to think of it. Also, for many in sales it is all about *looking* well-off, and that costs money, so it has to come from somewhere else in the budget.
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Old June 10, 2006, 12:16 AM   #18
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Smile Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

Hey All,

Just did Cancun 05/13 and Orlando last week with the kids. Did a TS presentation at both places with the resorts we were staying at as we exchangers in both cases.

The Cancun trip was at the Royal Mayan, which is a fantastic resort, and it was 100% laid back. We walked away with tickets to Xcaret and a feeling that I and the Salesman, Luis, were both honest upfront and throughout the presentation.

The presentation consisted of a breakfast buffet at the Royal Sands, video on the Royal Hacienda's at Playa Del Carmen, a talk on the dinero needed to buy in, and a finishing hand shake. Total time about 90 minutes including the meal. I think he knew that a sale wasn't happening about 15 minutes into the meal as we discussed the concept of timeshares, specific to Mexico, and that with my II exchange I could probably go 3 times for what their annual MF would cost.

Orlando was at the Marriot Horizons across the street from the Marriot Cyprus Harbour which is a wonderful and beautiful resort to stay at and close to everything. Cyprus Harbour is more the family relaxing resort while the Horizon appears geared to more fun and play.

The Salesman, Tom, looked the salesman both looks and talk wise. While I didn't ask Luis in Cancun about his ownerships, I did check with Tom on his. Of course he doesn't own any Marriot property , but owns 2 weeks in the Carribean.

He started out the pitch pushing the benfits of owning within Marriot with the ability to exchange and having preferred status on exchanges within II to other Marriot resorts and the cost per exhange being 89 rather than 149. Wouldn't you think that maybe Marriot, being as big as it is, should have a slightly lower price on that.

He also covered the Marriot points program where you can turn weeks into points and then use them like RCI points. What I found fascinating was that what Marriot gives you in points for your week is only about 50% of what you need to pay to get that same week from them. Take that fleecing along with the 25% commission to have them sell your week or the 50% commission for their renting it and it makes you want to buy right there on the spot. According to Tom, every 2 out of 10 buy. Of course, that was right around the time he was trying to push the value of our pimping for Marriot by sending our friends to them for Marriot points. I didn't know Marriot was into Multi Level Marketing programs.

While I think Marriot has some quality resorts, I just can't see tossing 20-30-40 G's down for a week and then get nailed with $800 in MF's for an Orlando location.

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Old June 10, 2006, 10:41 AM   #19
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Re: It's a job

Quote:
Originally Posted by PerryM
We used to go to the timeshare presentations (Tours) to try to learn something about timeshares – we now just go to make an average $300 (Maui) for 90 minutes work – that comes out to be $200 per hour while on vacation). Now we try to see just how fast we can get out by bringing up things that should have a sharp salesrep waving us goodbye while they grab another tour. Our goal is for 30 minutes which would be $600 per hour – now that’s more like it.

We typically swim and snorkel in the morning, (Maui) do a tour, and shop and dine out at night. Most of our expensive dinners are paid by the developers – thanks. We try to get a free lunch with the tour – sometimes they really put on the feedbag and you get a 4-course lunch. I do wish they would not have donuts but something more healthful for those of us who do quite a few of these. I keep suggesting this but they just don’t seem to listen.

There is an implied contract here – we give them up to 90 minutes of our vacation time and they try to sell us another timeshare. They asked the qualifying questions, which we always surpass and then it’s up to their product and sales skills.

I do try to gather some statistical data for later analysis: 1) does the salesrep own a timeshare? 2) Does the salesrep own a timeshare at the resort they currently sell at 3) Is the salesrep honest? 4) What new sales gimmicks have been added since our last visit 5) What new things are happening at the resort and for the developer 6) What is their level of timeshare knowledge 7) Current sales prices and MFs

I advise probably 50+ folks in a year how to use timeshares and someone’s got to look out for them. Thank goodness the developers pays for all of this.
I don't have any issues with something like this. You're going at their invitation and offer of free goodies. They're not prequalifying you so it's no big deal. While Hawaii might pay pretty well, most of the lower 48 presentations we've been offered have cash values in the $100-$150 range. At best that's $33 to $50/hr for each of us. At that rate it's more like actual work than making money on vacation.

Going to a timeshare presentation looking for an arguement or to prove a point to a salesman seems pointless and a good waste of time to me. Most don't apparently pay as well as Hawaii. The last few I've even entertained had a face value in the $100's but when you looked around and found the other discounts available for the same attractions/meals, it was considerably less value.
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Old June 10, 2006, 11:53 AM   #20
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Re: It's a job

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Originally Posted by dougp26364
The last few I've even entertained had a face value in the $100's but when you looked around and found the other discounts available for the same attractions/meals, it was considerably less value.
And if you wouldn't otherwise have gone to the attraction or eaten the meals at those places it would be of NO value whatsoever. Free Disney passes, on the other hand, may be worth sitting through a presentation for....
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Old June 10, 2006, 12:36 PM   #21
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

The woman I overheard from Fairfield owns a timeshare herself, as she told the man, I just couldn't remember where.

Selling timeshare should have been fun. Imaging meeting people, if pre-qualified, who are already half sold with the idea and with money burning in their pocket. It could have been fun and satisfying selling something that you know people will enjoy year after year. Unfortunately, the bad quality of salespeople and the high marketing costs ruined the reputation in the industry. I wonder what will happen if they just take their time selling, let people come to them, cut the high marketing costs and commission, advertise as traditional real estate new developement, and pass the savings to buyers? I guess that will be too much to ask for.

Being in sales myself, I would NOT buy anything from the man, he is a hustler. He is the type that will say anything to get the sales and make the money without remorse. It is scary to think how many people sank their money with him and Westgate.
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Old June 10, 2006, 02:54 PM   #22
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

I think Boca's numbers are pretty accurate. At christmas Mountain, salesmen are expected to average $2000 a tour in sales, so if they sell one in five tours a $10,000 sale, they keep their job. Huge bonuses kick in when they hit a certain number. Many make over $200,000 a year. The strange thing is they don't know how to keep the money. We have had 4 timeshare salesmen homes repossessed by the banks in our neighborhood, some of the homes about 5000 square feet. One salesman, who was a high level salesman for an interenational company before retirement, told a neighbor, also a salesman, that this was so easy, because they come to you, you don't have to go to them.
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Old June 11, 2006, 08:38 AM   #23
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

We all have visions of a poor old widow women being taken for her last 20,000 on a timeshare tour. While that may happen, I imagine more often than not, the sales are made to folks with tons of discretionary income who work really hard and have no time to pinch pennies or any inclination to do so. Indeed, these are the types that would be offended if you suggest they could go on the internet and buy "used." I think that there are a lot more of these types hanging out at Marriott, Hyatt and other high end presentations than we know about. For these folks, off the shelf purchases are a good deal because it guuarantees them at least one week a year vacation. Selling timeshares to this group would be easy and fun.
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Old June 11, 2006, 09:08 AM   #24
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

That's not surprising. When I was in direct sales the owners of the company always had ways to keep you broke. That kept you hungry and their hold on you.

I was the only one that ran a credit balance in my account. I knew they would have something come along that needed money, so I wanted it there, rather than in a house/cars/boats, etc.

They did not like that.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rapmarks
The strange thing is they don't know how to keep the money. We have had 4 timeshare salesmen homes repossessed by the banks in our neighborhood, some of the homes about 5000 square feet. .
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Old June 11, 2006, 09:15 AM   #25
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Re: Something I overheard between two timeshare salesperson

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Originally Posted by funtime
Indeed, these are the types that would be offended if you suggest they could go on the internet and buy "used."
I was one one of those people! (sort of)

I've said this before.........

If I had not purchased my MGV from Marriott, I would not have purchased. Timeshares were a waste of time and money. It was only after our tour (loosing our house to a fire 5 months prior), did we decided it was for us!

Yes in the future, NOW I would buy a resale. But I still don't regret my purchase at all.

Due to an illness I have only been able to travel once this year, which was to Marriott Heritage Club Hilton Head! We played golf for a whole week on 3 beautfiul courses, not something I would have ever done if I had to pay to go . For 2007 we have 3 trips planned, Aruba Surf Club, Royal Mayan, and MGV.

I don't know if our timeshare salesman was a good salesman or not. Don't know if he was completely honest or not. But what he was able to do was show us how Marriott could fill up our travel dreams! I really can't think of one thing that he lied about.... He did stress the golf ALOT, which I haven't found that many good deals on other than the Heritage Club.

We had been paying to travel to Sandals $4000-$5000 per year, so Marriott seemed to make a pretty good deal compared to that. In my 6 years of Traveling to Sandals, I could have bought another developer week at MGV!

I also will NEVER EVER travel with my daughter (age 11 now), and stay in a hotel room. That was definitely something leaning us towards a timeshare!

Amy
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