TUG MEMBERS: Joining TUG does not automatically register you as a user of the TUG Bulletin Board. You must register yourself.


*ads are disabled when logged in as a member*
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. The TUGBBS forums are completely free and open to the public and exist as the absolute best place for owners to get help and advice about their timeshares for more than 24 years!

    Join tens of thousands of other owners just like you here to get any and all Timeshare questions answered!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. TUG started 25 years ago this month in 1993 as a group of regular Timeshare owners just like you!

    Check out our happy birthday post here: Happy Birthday TUG!
    Dismiss Notice
  4. TUG has now saved timeshare owners more than $10,000,000 dollars just by finding us in time to rescind a new Timeshare purchase! A truly incredible milestone!

    Read more here: TUG saves owners more than $10Million dollars
    Dismiss Notice
  5. Sign up to get the TUG Newsletter for free! Join tens of thousands of other owners who get this every week! Latest resort reviews and the most important topics discussed by owners during the week!
    Dismiss Notice
  6. TUG is trying out a new program that will trade you a TUG membership for a Timeshare resort review if you are an expired member, or even just a guest here on the forums!

    Read more here
    Dismiss Notice
  7. Our official "end my sales presentation early" T-shirts are available again! Also come with the option for a free membership extension with purchase to offset the cost!

    Read more Here
    Dismiss Notice
  8. Follow the TUG Member Banner as it travels the world on vacation with Timeshare owners! Also sign up to get the banner sent to you so you can submit a photo of your vacation with the banner to share with TUG! Banner Thread
    Dismiss Notice
  9. A few of the most common links here on the forums for newbies and guests!
    Dismiss Notice

5 Things to Know About Buying Scotch Whisky That You Probably Got Wrong

Discussion in 'TUG Lounge' started by MULTIZ321, Nov 7, 2018.

  1. MULTIZ321

    MULTIZ321 TUG Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    14,114
    Likes Received:
    1,042
    Trophy Points:
    498
    Location:
    FT. LAUDERDALE, FL
    Resorts Owned:
    BLUEWATER BY SPINNAKER HHI
    ROYAL HOLIDAY CLUB RHC (POINTS)
    5 Things to Know About Buying Scotch Whisky That You Probably Got Wrong
    By David Hammond/ Chicago Tribune/ Dining/ chicagotribune.com

    "It’s the season for a warming dram of scotch, but if you’re unfamiliar with the storied spirit, the thousands of brands might be a bit off-putting. So here are some guidelines for getting the best scotch for your money and the most enjoyment from every drop you sip.

    1. There’s much to be said for blended Scotch whisky....."

    [​IMG]
    A single malt Scotch whisky is not necessarily better than a blended one. Blends enable "drinkers to experience a complex array of aromas and flavors crafted by expertly blending together single malt and grain whiskies," says Tristan Campbell. (Ken Hively / Los Angeles Times)


    Richard
     
    DrQ and plpgma like this.
  2. DrQ

    DrQ TUG Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2005
    Messages:
    255
    Likes Received:
    131
    Trophy Points:
    253
    Location:
    DFW
    Agreed, my favorite is Grants. It is from the same distillery as Balvenie. If they are blending those whiskies, what's not to like?

    A single cube of ice in your scotch neat. :thumbup:
     
  3. taterhed

    taterhed TUG Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Messages:
    4,066
    Likes Received:
    1,453
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Location:
    Virginia
    Resorts Owned:
    Westin WKORV OFD
    Marriott's Grande Vista
    Worldmark x2
    These articles are so contrived.

    Not to be argumentative.....but there is no blend that can compare to certain (majority) single malts.
    It's like saying "Jack Daniels is the best Whiskey"

    Well, maybe to you.

    There's a few blends I like......but my only motivation in buying a blend is $$$$$

    Here's my 5 points:
    1. There are 'good' blended scotches and 'good' single malts. There are LOTS of bad whisky's and whiskeys too! Explore. Explore. Explore. Buying the same old blend is like being married. (Scratch that, JK).
    2. Sherry? Bourbon? Beer? What's the 'best' cask for Scotch?: The answer is....the one you like the best. To each his/her own!
    3. Paying more money for Scotch or buying 'older' Scotch doesn't necessarily mean you'll enjoy it more..... AGE
      1. Older, more expensive Scotch requires MORE. More time to enjoy (never rush old scotch). More experience to appreciate (if you've only tasted 3 Scotches, can you really appreciate a 25 y/o?). More palate experience to appreciate subtle differences and a less aggressive attack on your palate. More money.....
      2. Instead, consider buying a wider variety of Scotch and determining the flavor profile(s) that suit you best. Then, with some experience in your 'favorite' profiles (mine is Sherry Monster), consider acquiring a more expensive or aged scotch to appreciate the specific effect of aging (or cask etc...).
      3. No Age Statement: All Scotch is a minimum of 3 years aged. Scotch with a listed age (e.g. '12 year old') contains spirits no-younger than the stated age (but may contain older spirits). In the annuls of Scotch, there have been many fantastic long-aged Whisky's....age can produce a finer spirit. But, there have also been remarkable 'young' whisky's of a mere 7 years.... In any case, consider this: NAS whisky is a marketing play that addresses the consumer preference for 'older Scotch.' This is big split issue. Only personal taste can critique the quality of NAS Scotch.
    4. Dark or light Scotch? Color is not a valid indicator or age or quality, it's a reflection of the production, distillation and aging. But know this: adding ARTIFICIAL color is an indication of marketing and a poor reflection on the Distillery in general (IMNSHO). Consider avoiding companies that add artificial color to their whisky.
    5. Marketing: Three things stand-out that you should consider (IMO)
      • NAS: The cost of Scotch Whisky has risen drastically...in part by certain 'unnamed parties' randomly purchasing vast amounts of premium Whisky based largely on name, age, color and allure. In response, the industry is attempted to release high-quality age blends at a reasonable price.....but without revealing the age of the youngest whisky in the bottle. Sometimes it produces a fantastic product at a better price...sometimes its just marketing. Only you can judge.
      • Artificial color: As stated above, distilleries are adding color to whisky to match consumer expectations that good Scotch should be: dark brown, long aged, expensive and begin with the letter Mc. This is bad practice to say the least. AVOID
      • Chill filtering: Distilleries claim that consumers prefer and expect their Scotch to be: Crystal Clear, 'smooth drinking', extremely (moronically) uniform in taste. Thus, the perfect solution: remove some of the 'scotch whisky' essence, replace it with water (40% ABV) and sell more of it. This is sad. It is the equivalent 'processed cheese.' Again, you are being 'marketed' and will know the difference if your palate is sufficiently educated (educate your palate today!). Avoid if possible.
    My ramblings.
     
  4. MULTIZ321

    MULTIZ321 TUG Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    14,114
    Likes Received:
    1,042
    Trophy Points:
    498
    Location:
    FT. LAUDERDALE, FL
    Resorts Owned:
    BLUEWATER BY SPINNAKER HHI
    ROYAL HOLIDAY CLUB RHC (POINTS)
    I decided to revive some previous posts about Whisky (Whiskey) so information would be in one spot for those interested:
    Is It Whisky or Whiskey and Why It Matters
    By Joseph V. Micallef/ Food & Drink/ Forbes/ forbes.com

    "The Irish spell whiskey with an e between the k and the y while their Scottish counterparts leave out the e. The distinction, in addition to being the bane of proof readers, also offers some important insights into the evolution and history of whisky.

    Canada, India and Japan, the three other major whisky producers, also follow the Scottish spelling. Most of the rest of the world has followed suit. The US follows the Irish example and spells whiskey with an e, although there are a number of major exceptions. George Dickel, Makers Mark and Old Forester all follow the Scottish spelling.

    There are any number of theories to explain the alternative spelling of whiskies, from differing translations of uisge beatha, the original name for whisky, between Irish and Scotch Gaelic to myopic typesetters or personal taste. The reality, however, is far more complex.

    Until the late 19th century, most of the world spelled whisky without an e. Even the major Irish distillers, then the biggest in the world, followed the practice, as did American distillers.

    In 1860, the Gladstone government passed the Spirits Act. The act allowed whisky blenders, for the first time, to create blends consisting of grain whisky and single malts. At the time, Ireland was the center of the world’s whisky production.

    Irish distillers were producing around 70% of the world’s whisky. Irish whiskey was the most popular in the world, even out selling its Scottish rivals in England and Scotland....."

    [​IMG]
    A 19th century advertisement for Cork DistilleriesPhoto, J Micallef


    Richard
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2018 at 11:58 PM
  5. MULTIZ321

    MULTIZ321 TUG Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    14,114
    Likes Received:
    1,042
    Trophy Points:
    498
    Location:
    FT. LAUDERDALE, FL
    Resorts Owned:
    BLUEWATER BY SPINNAKER HHI
    ROYAL HOLIDAY CLUB RHC (POINTS)
    9 Whisky Distilleries You Must Visit in Scotland
    By Alexander Crow/ See & Do/ Europe/ United-Kingdom/ Scotland/ Culture Trip/ theculturetrip.com

    "Ask anyone around the globe what springs to mind when you mention Scotland and — as well as shortbread, tartan kilts, and bagpipes — you can bet they will mention whisky. The country is split into six distinct whisky producing regions and, in total, there are over 125 different distilleries. Many of these allow visitors a glimpse at their creative process through tours, which usually end in sampling their wares. This guide shares nine of the best to visit....."

    Richard
     
  6. MULTIZ321

    MULTIZ321 TUG Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    14,114
    Likes Received:
    1,042
    Trophy Points:
    498
    Location:
    FT. LAUDERDALE, FL
    Resorts Owned:
    BLUEWATER BY SPINNAKER HHI
    ROYAL HOLIDAY CLUB RHC (POINTS)
    The Best Scotch Whiskies Under $100
    Editors Picks/ Gear Patrol/ gearpatrol.com

    "This definitive guide to affordable Scotch explores everything you need to know about the world’s most popular single malt whisky, including important regions and the best bottles you can buy under $100...."

    [​IMG]


    Richard
     
  7. dougp26364

    dougp26364 TUG Review Crew: Veteran TUG Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    12,244
    Likes Received:
    275
    Trophy Points:
    418
    I don’t drink very much or very often but, as cooler temps hit, I generally find a nice adult beverage enjoyable. To that end I’ve found Scotch whiskey and bourbon’s to offer a wide array of choices to explore with scotch having a much wider range of tastes to either like or dislike (hate). Holiday season brings out the small sample packs I love to try for both cost and range in sampling.
    Over the years I’ve found I either enjoy a scotch or hate it. Those I really like have been Belvenie (except for their Caribbean cask) and Glenlevet. I can enjoy Dewars white label in a pinch. Those I really don’t like have been Glenfidich and Glenmorangie.
     
  8. taterhed

    taterhed TUG Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Messages:
    4,066
    Likes Received:
    1,453
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Location:
    Virginia
    Resorts Owned:
    Westin WKORV OFD
    Marriott's Grande Vista
    Worldmark x2
    Thanks, Richard @MULTIZ321, for capturing these in a single spot.

    @dougp26364 , your comments are telling.....

    Many of the Scotch Whisky's you've listed have over-lapping profiles; depending on the specific bottle/flavor/vintage etc....
    Several of the Glenmorangie's and Glenlivet's would be extremely difficult to identify 'which is which?' unless you're a frequent sipper of both (or one only).

    Of course, taste and choice are what it's all about. I frequently dislike a particular bottling even though I may adore certain vintages/brands. It's the mystery of the chase.

    If you've never tried them, consider trying a Scotch conditioned in Sherry casks.....of course, based on your statements, you may already have...
    I'd suggest Aberlour A'bunadh (sherry monster, cask strength, add a bit of water), GlenDronach 12, or even a Macallan 12.
    Since you like Balvenie, you could try the 15 Year Old Single Barrel Sherry Cask, but it's a bit dear and harder to find. Somewhat less distinctive as well.


    Cheers.
     

Share This Page