TUG MEMBERS: Joining TUG does not automatically register you as a user of the TUG Bulletin Board. You must register yourself.


*ads are disabled when logged in as a member*
  1. This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More.
  2. The TUGBBS forums are completely free and open to the public and exist as the absolute best place for owners to get help and advice about their timeshares for more than 25 years!

    Join tens of thousands of other owners just like you here to get any and all Timeshare questions answered!
    Dismiss Notice
  3. TUG has now saved timeshare owners more than $12,000,000 dollars just by finding us in time to rescind a new Timeshare purchase! A truly incredible milestone!

    Read more here: TUG saves owners more than $12Million dollars
    Dismiss Notice
  4. Sign up to get the TUG Newsletter for free! Join tens of thousands of other owners who get this every week! Latest resort reviews and the most important topics discussed by owners during the week!
    Dismiss Notice
  5. TUG is trying out a new program that will trade you a TUG membership for a Timeshare resort review if you are an expired member, or even just a guest here on the forums!

    Read more here
    Dismiss Notice
  6. Our official "end my sales presentation early" T-shirts are available again! Also come with the option for a free membership extension with purchase to offset the cost!

    Read more Here
    Dismiss Notice
  7. Follow the TUG Member Banner as it travels the world on vacation with Timeshare owners! Also sign up to get the banner sent to you so you can submit a photo of your vacation with the banner to share with TUG! Banner Thread
    Dismiss Notice
  8. TUG has now joined Priceline.com as an affiliate!

    Members and guests who book air travel, rental cars and even Cruise Vacations thru TUG's priceline links will now support TUG in the process!

    Read more here
  9. A few of the most common links here on the forums for newbies and guests!
    Dismiss Notice

How to Dry Age a Ribeye in the Fridge

Discussion in 'TUG Lounge' started by MULTIZ321, Oct 9, 2019.

  1. MULTIZ321

    MULTIZ321 TUG Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    17,293
    Likes Received:
    2,554
    Trophy Points:
    598
    Location:
    FT. LAUDERDALE, FL
    Resorts Owned:
    BLUEWATER BY SPINNAKER HHI
    ROYAL HOLIDAY CLUB RHC (POINTS)
    How to Dry Age a Ribeye in the Fridge
    By Fred Decker/ Nutrition/ Main Dishes/ Meat Recipes/ LiveStrong/ livestrong.com


    "The difference between good beef and great beef is sometimes due to the qualities of the animal itself. More often, however, the difference is because of how that beef is handled after slaughter. Most modern beef is wet-aged, an economical and cost-effective process. However, the best beef is dry aged in the traditional fashion. Although some work is involved, any food lover can dry-age a prime cut such as ribeye at home in the fridge....."

    [​IMG]
    (Image: IgorDutina/iStock/Getty Images)


    Richard
     
    flexible, geoand and Gypsy65 like this.
  2. Gypsy65

    Gypsy65 TUG Member

    Joined:
    May 11, 2019
    Messages:
    333
    Likes Received:
    250
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Resorts Owned:
    HIVC
    Has anyone tried this?

    I’ve always wanted to dry age our steaks but have obvious concerns
     
  3. melissy123

    melissy123 TUG Member

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2010
    Messages:
    984
    Likes Received:
    141
    Trophy Points:
    153
    I’ve done something a little simpler and faster Put sea salt or kosher salt on both sides. Place on paper towel on top of plate and place in coldest part of the fridge for a day before grilling
     
  4. bizaro86

    bizaro86 TUG Member

    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2008
    Messages:
    2,087
    Likes Received:
    953
    Trophy Points:
    323
    Location:
    Calgary, AB, Canada
    I have. I did it in a small "bar size" refrigerator with nothing else in it. I felt like that eliminated many potential issues.

    However, by the time you consider the loss of weight due to moisture and the loss of meat from cutting off the edges, I didn't think it was worth it.

    Our local grocer sells high quality dry aged Alberta beef, they dry age it in store. It's quite a bit more than the regular cuts, but once you account for the loss of weight in doing it yourself I think the price is comparable. So I'm content to let the experts do it for me.
     
  5. Passepartout

    Passepartout TUG Review Crew: Veteran TUG Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2007
    Messages:
    21,338
    Likes Received:
    4,829
    Trophy Points:
    599
    Location:
    Twin Falls, Eye-Duh-Hoe
    I DO salt good (prime) ribeyes and keep them in the fridge on a rack for a day or two under cheesecloth, then ALWAYS bring them out about 4+ hours before grilling to come to room temp then blot with paper towels before going onto a 500+ degree grill. The BEST was a brace of bison ribeyes. You could cut 'em with the side of your fork. Absolutely sublime if you're a carnivore. If you're not into meat, not so much.

    Jim
     
  6. pedro47

    pedro47 TUG Review Crew: Expert TUG Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    10,751
    Likes Received:
    1,827
    Trophy Points:
    498
    Location:
    East Coast
    You guys are making me wanting a steak for breakfast.
     
    DannyTS and Beachclubmum like this.
  7. CO skier

    CO skier TUG Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2012
    Messages:
    1,856
    Likes Received:
    419
    Trophy Points:
    193
    Location:
    Colorado
    I buy a prime grade tomahawk steak at Costco -- kind of a roast on a stick. Unwrap it, rinse it well and thoroughly dry it with paper towels. Season it with salt (helps with this short dry-aging process) and put it on a rack over a plate in the fridge for at least 24 hours and preferably 48, turning it over halfway through the drying process.

    The surface develops that "beef jerky" texture, but not so much that anything needs to be trimmed before grilling. The surface of the grilled steak is no different than a non-dry-aged steak, but the flavor difference is amazing. Give it a try.
     
    Gypsy65 likes this.
  8. pedro47

    pedro47 TUG Review Crew: Expert TUG Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    10,751
    Likes Received:
    1,827
    Trophy Points:
    498
    Location:
    East Coast
    CO skier, when you place the tomahawk steak in the fridge. do you cover it with a second plate? Do you use regular table salt or sea salt or kosher salt?
    Also, can you wrap the tomahawk steak in a very large zip lock bag and let it set in the fridge for three (3) to four (4) days ?

    I am going to Costco Saturday to purchase a tomahawk steak.
    Wish me well. I'm not a very good cook.:p
     
  9. CO skier

    CO skier TUG Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2012
    Messages:
    1,856
    Likes Received:
    419
    Trophy Points:
    193
    Location:
    Colorado
    I do not cover the steak. It sits in the fridge just like you see steaks displayed in the meat counter (except mine is on a rack for full air circulation). I use Himalayan Pink Salt, sometimes Lawry's seasoning salt. Garlic salt might be interesting. Use whatever salt you normally use to season your steaks. The dry-aging process intensifies the seasoning salt flavors, so start with half salt and half seasoning salt to get the taste you prefer.

    You will notice that the meat changes to a darker, richer red color as it ages. This is normal. (Lawry's salt give a bit of an orange tint to the meat).


    No, this would defeat the entire dry-aging process.


    I think the tomahawks are available only on weekends at Costco.
    Those prime steaks really flare up on the grill, even gas grills, so be careful about that. A little fire sear is nice, but do not let the steak burn.

    I fire up grill to 600F, place the tomahawk steak on one far side of the grill for about 3 minutes (there is usually a fire surrounding the steak), then I flip is over and place it at the other far side of the grill for 3 minutes (more flames there). Flip and rotate the steak 90 degrees and back on the far side of the grill away from the flames for 3 minutes, then flip, rotate to the other side for 3 minutes. Done right, and you should have a nicely seared steak with the cross-hatch pattern you get in restaurants. But that roast on a stick is not done. I take it inside and put the tomahawk steak in a 350F oven for 30-40 minutes (less time for thinner steaks) until it reaches desired doneness.

    Here is a good video that demonstrates using fire to sear, then off to another part of the grill until the flames return.

    https://www.bing.com/videos/search?...7AA148BB7F2EA847C66D7AA148BB7F2E&&FORM=VDRVRV

    Those tomahawk steaks are a real "investment". If you are not an experience griller, you might want to buy a package of the prime strip steaks. Dry-age all of them. If your first attempt at grilling one does not work out, no big loss, and you have a few more steaks to try. If your first attempt is successful (which I am sure it will be), then you can wrap the remaining dry-aged steaks in plastic wrap and freeze, and you are ready to move up to the tomahawk. Good luck and let us know how it goes.
     
    Gypsy65 likes this.
  10. pedro47

    pedro47 TUG Review Crew: Expert TUG Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    10,751
    Likes Received:
    1,827
    Trophy Points:
    498
    Location:
    East Coast
    :thumbup:To CO skier, Thanks you for your detail process. I have printed it and I am wishing myself success. LOL.

    Loved that video. :thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:
     
    Gypsy65 likes this.
  11. taterhed

    taterhed TUG Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Messages:
    4,412
    Likes Received:
    1,737
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Location:
    Virginia
    Resorts Owned:
    Westin WKORV OFD
    Marriott's Grande Vista
    Worldmark x2
    There are several youtube videos that demonstrate the 'butter log' or butter-wrap technique.

    I'm dying to try it. less waste, more flavor (herbs in butter) and a package that needs little attention or care.
    check it out

    1 steak or a whole roast!! Can be applied by hand or dipped (lot o butter for that!
    upload_2019-10-11_14-13-57.png
     
  12. TheTimeTraveler

    TheTimeTraveler TUG Member

    Joined:
    Jan 23, 2008
    Messages:
    2,732
    Likes Received:
    401
    Trophy Points:
    318
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    Wegman's Supermarkets sell aged beef..... It's not cheap but it's quite good.....


    .
     
  13. taterhed

    taterhed TUG Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Messages:
    4,412
    Likes Received:
    1,737
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Location:
    Virginia
    Resorts Owned:
    Westin WKORV OFD
    Marriott's Grande Vista
    Worldmark x2

    And with a 20% down-payment, the interest rates are pretty low right now too!
    upload_2019-10-11_15-59-59.png
     
    LisaH likes this.
  14. LisaH

    LisaH TUG Lifetime Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    3,595
    Likes Received:
    334
    Trophy Points:
    418
    Location:
    SF Bay Area, CA
    I used to live in Western N.Y. I miss Wegman's...
     
  15. CO skier

    CO skier TUG Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2012
    Messages:
    1,856
    Likes Received:
    419
    Trophy Points:
    193
    Location:
    Colorado
    I accepted the challenge and Googled, since you did not post any specific videos. I got "60-Days BUTTER DRY AGED Experiment vs Real Dry Aged Steaks!

    C'mon. 60 DAYS! versus 48 hours with what I posted?
     
    Gypsy65 likes this.
  16. pedro47

    pedro47 TUG Review Crew: Expert TUG Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    10,751
    Likes Received:
    1,827
    Trophy Points:
    498
    Location:
    East Coast
    I purchased a package of three prime ribeyes from Costco today. I am using your receipt. Steaks are in the fridge uncovered.

    That Tomahawk Steak was huge in Costco.
     
    Gypsy65 likes this.
  17. Passepartout

    Passepartout TUG Review Crew: Veteran TUG Member

    Joined:
    Feb 10, 2007
    Messages:
    21,338
    Likes Received:
    4,829
    Trophy Points:
    599
    Location:
    Twin Falls, Eye-Duh-Hoe
    Looking forward to the report. I looked at steaks at Costco yesterday, but didn't have time to sit down with a mortgage broker to finance one. Went home with a $4.99 chicken instead.

    DW and I split a $1.50 dog & Coke for lunch.
     
    amycurl and LisaH like this.
  18. lockewong

    lockewong TUG Member

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2015
    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    87
    Trophy Points:
    78
    Location:
    San Francisco Bay Area
    Resorts Owned:
    Marriott Maui Ocean Club, Marriott Kauai Beach Club, HGVC Sea World, Bay Club, Tahoe Seasons
    I used a technique for dry-aging that Cook's Illustrated published about 15 years ago. I followed it to the letter. It worked well. Similar to the method COSkier posted, do not cover it. Place the meat on a rack over a plate in the refrigerator. Cut off the "dark red, jerky-like meat." I did this for three days. No bacterial issues. It was very flavorful and tender. I used it for a flatiron and for ribeyes. The Tomahawks at Costco are the bomb and they let you choose your own steak so I try for more marbling. I bought them for a New Year's Eve feast last year. A splurge, definitely.
     
    Gypsy65 likes this.
  19. pedro47

    pedro47 TUG Review Crew: Expert TUG Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    10,751
    Likes Received:
    1,827
    Trophy Points:
    498
    Location:
    East Coast
    We just finish dinner using this dry aging steak process. No 1, my spouse does not rib-eye steaks. This Sunday, she ate a whole 3” thick ribeye steak with no steak sauce. Conclusion, the ribeye steaks taste different and they were very good.
    Thanks CO skier for your cooking method.:thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup::thumbup:
     
    Gypsy65 likes this.
  20. taterhed

    taterhed TUG Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Messages:
    4,412
    Likes Received:
    1,737
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Location:
    Virginia
    Resorts Owned:
    Westin WKORV OFD
    Marriott's Grande Vista
    Worldmark x2

    Well, a few comments:

    1. Dry aged beef requires 14-21 days to even remotely begin the 'ageing' process. Not my opinion, its the simple truth.
    2. Dry BRINED beef can be done in 'hours to days'
    3. Brineing tenderizes and flavors beef. Most importantly, it reduces the external moisture on the beef and permits better browning/searing and forms a better crust. 'Over-flavoring' is possible if you're not careful.
    4. Steaks aged 1-7 days loose 3-7% of their weight (moisture). Cooked steaks average out to the same finished weight. (no loss)
    5. Bringing steaks to 'near room temp' prior to cooking will also significantly improve the finished product (not for sous vide)
    6. I like dry-brining foods. It's a great technique. Wet steak equals steamed beef. Yuk.
    Dry aging.,...

    1. Takes at least 14 days and preferably 21 days or more.
    2. Should not be done in a 'general' refrigerator due to the presence of bacteria
    3. Can not be done by simply placing the naked steak in the fridge
    4. 10-20% loss of weight due to aging. There is definitely loss of product due to significant trimming required prior to cooking
    5. Dry aged meat has a stronger, unique flavor that may not immediately appeal to everyone.....
    So, @CO skier I agree. There isn't much comparison to 'dry-brine' (a technique I love) and dry-age. And, there is no requirement to age to 60 days to achieve the true dry-aged flavor. 21 day old steak is truthfully dry-aged.

    My intent--in pointing out the 'butter' technique--was to demonstrate a way to produce true dry-aged beef in a safer manner (vs some other tech.) that also preserves the actual weight of the beef and results in significantly less loss of mass in the finished product. In truth, I think the butter technique produces a product which is significantly less aged than the membrane-bag 60 day beef. But, you can also add herbs to the butter and flavor your beef at the same time (so they say...not tried it yet). Maybe I need to put my steak where my mouth is......

    Cheers!

    Some videos: The dry aged myth and the 'butter technique'

    The dry aged myth....

    The butter technique
     
  21. pedro47

    pedro47 TUG Review Crew: Expert TUG Member

    Joined:
    Jun 6, 2005
    Messages:
    10,751
    Likes Received:
    1,827
    Trophy Points:
    498
    Location:
    East Coast
    All I know my wife ate the whole steak. The Two steaks were in the fridge for between 20 & 30 hours and uncovered .
     
    Beachclubmum likes this.
  22. taterhed

    taterhed TUG Member

    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2011
    Messages:
    4,412
    Likes Received:
    1,737
    Trophy Points:
    298
    Location:
    Virginia
    Resorts Owned:
    Westin WKORV OFD
    Marriott's Grande Vista
    Worldmark x2
    Again, I love using the dry-brine technique (salt) it's great.
     
  23. CO skier

    CO skier TUG Member

    Joined:
    Sep 18, 2012
    Messages:
    1,856
    Likes Received:
    419
    Trophy Points:
    193
    Location:
    Colorado
    After reading the "Dry aged myth" article, I think that the significant flavor improvement I am noticing may be due to the quasi salt-curing process, not 2 days of "dry-aging."

    This hypothesis is supported by:

    1. The test steaks in the dry-aged experiment that resulted in "no difference vs. non-refrigerator-aged steaks" were not salted as part of the aging process. There is a most noticeable flavor difference between a steak salted then aged two days in a refrigerator and a steak salted and immediately grilled or grilled and immediately salted. Anyone can perform this experiment in 48 hours using a single steak cut in half and treated by the two different methods. (I tried aging a salted steak for 72 hours in the fridge but did not notice any flavor improvement versus 48 hours, but there was an improvement at 48 hours versus 24).

    2. As I noted in the post on my process, a reduction in seasoning salt is recommended as a starting point because the 2 days in the refrigerator intensifies the seasoning effect.

    As a completely unscientific data point, when I served a salted and 2-day aged steak to my 20-year-old son, he commented out of the blue, "This is the best steak I have ever eaten."

    I now salt my steaks before freezing. I also salt my steaks 2-days before grilling them and dry-age in the home fridge. I think both of these processes noticeably improves the flavor of the finished product.

    I salted and 2-day dry-aged (home fridge) a Costco tomahawk steak and served it for dinner last night. The saltiness (which gives a steak its flavor) just seemed to permeate the entire thick steak so much so that I will be cutting down somewhat on the salt for future steaks. For me it is definitely worth the little bit of extra effort and 48 hours.

    I suggest that anyone who enjoys a good steak to give it a try.

    Sorry, but there is no way I am going to give a 60-day aging process a try, especially after reading about the sketchy 9-day-aged steak in the "dry-aged myth" experiment.

    I also do not get the whole cheesecloth thing. Cheesecloth would only absorb any moisture and hold it next to the steak that is supposed to be drying out.
     

Share This Page